1 seconds delay in page load time, its huge loss in UI conversions rate

I never thought FB ‘like’ button give a negative impact to a site before , until I read matthew ogborne blog. Mat is an e-commerce consultant that created analysis on Facebook ‘like button’.¬† He calculated that a site with Facebook ‘like’ button required additional downloading script of 84kb or impact the page load time of 1.34 seconds.

And give more  1.34 seconds can make a lot of different in conversion rate.

Why ?

According to the findings of the surveys conducted by Lightner, Bose and Salvendy (1996) and the GVU (Graphic, Visualization and Usability) Centre at Georgia Tech (GVU, 1998), long download times have always been a major problem experienced by Web users. The survey by Pitkow and Kehoe (1996) also indicates that the most widely cited problem with using the world wide web was that it took too long to download web pages (i.e. 69{e56e98cffb3900b5e8849a3588d7fad4e42d0c2720d7b074b7ab4ed4811d4b0a} of respondents cited this problem).
For e-commerce sites, web loading times are even more crucial than other sites. It has been found that a delay of microseconds can potentially cause a significant loss of revenue. Tests at Amazon revealed similar results: every 100 ms increase in load time of Amazon.com decreased sales by 1{e56e98cffb3900b5e8849a3588d7fad4e42d0c2720d7b074b7ab4ed4811d4b0a} (Kohavi and Longbotham 2007). Google discovered that a change in a 10-result page loading in 0.4 seconds to a 30-result page loading in 0.9 seconds decreased traffic and ad revenues by 20{e56e98cffb3900b5e8849a3588d7fad4e42d0c2720d7b074b7ab4ed4811d4b0a} (Linden 2006).

so.. every seconds count..

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*